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Posts tagged: catholic

Lenten Lesson #2

The sky is so big in the desert. It takes up so much more of your field of vision and focus than when you’re anywhere else. In the same way, we can see eternity better in the desert of Lent than in our comfort zones.

April is dedicated to the Blessed Sacrament

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Blessed be Jesus in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar!

Lenten Lesson #1

When I start to think that I know how to love like God loves, He transcends my understanding. He is always more!

With its calls to conversion, Lent comes providentially to rouse us, to shake us from our torpor, from the risk of moving forward [merely] by inertia. The exhortation that the Lord speaks to us through the prophet Joel is loud and clear: “Return to me with all your heart” (Joel 2:12). Why must we return to God? Because something is wrong in us, in society, in the Church - and we need to change, to turn things around, to repent! Once again Lent comes to make its prophetic appeal, to remind us that it is possible to realize something new within ourselves and around us, simply because God is faithful, continues to be full of goodness and mercy, and is always ready to forgive and start over from scratch. With this filial confidence, let us set out on our way!
Pope Francis

You see that the love [the Apostle] John speaks of is not the love of soap operas! No, it is something else. Christian love has a particular quality: concreteness. Christian love is concrete. Jesus Himself, when He speaks of love, speaks to us about concrete things: feeding the hungry, visiting the sick, and many concrete things. Love is concrete… .

And when this concreteness is not there, you can live a Christianity of illusions, because you don’t understand where the centre of Jesus’ message is. This love does not arrive at concrete being: it is a love of illusions, like the illusions the disciples had when, looking at Jesus, they thought He was a ghost.

Pope Francis, from today’s homily
"Humility" by Jessica Powers

Humility is to be still
under the weathers of God’s will.
It is to have no hurt surprise
when morning’s ruddy promise dies,
when wind and drought destroy, or sweet
spring rains apostatize in sleet,
or when the mind and month remark
a superfluity of dark.
It is to have no troubled care
for human weathers anywhere.
And yet it is to take the good
with the warm hands of gratitude.
Humility is to have place
deep in the secret of God’s face
where one can know, past all surmise,
that God’s great will alone is wise,
where one is loved, where one can trust
a strength not circumscribed by dust.
It is to have a place to hide
when all is hurricane outside.

There is nothing more beautiful than to be surprised by the Gospel, by the encounter with Christ…and to speak to others of our friendship with him.
Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI